Archive for the Hong Kong Category

“Shaolin” [新少林寺] (2011) – Exclusive Review [Sweet & Sour Cinema / Sweet & Sour Cinema Exclusive Review]

Posted in Andy Lau 刘德华, Buddhism, China, Fan Bingbing 范冰冰, Hong Kong, Jackie Chan 成龙, Kung Fu 功夫, Martial Arts, Nicholas Tse 谢霆锋, Shaolin Temple 少林寺, Sweet & Sour Cinema, Sweet & Sour Cinema exclusive flim review on September 9, 2011 by Zuo Shou / 左手

“Shaolin” [新少林寺] (2011) – Review by Zuo Shou 左手

Directed by Benny Chan

Starring: Andy Lau, Nicholas Tse, Fan Bingbing, Jackie Chan

Review of Mandarin version, w/o English subs

[Qualifier: this reviewer is not fully fluent in Mandarin, which may affect the film appreciation]
***

Watching this film – the title literally meaning “New Shaolin Temple” – was a happy circumstance for this long-time martial arts film fan: a cinematic experience that surpassed expectations and reached epic significance.

The rich mythos of Shaolin Temple has been heavily mined in action films over the years, yielding several classics: “The 36th Chamber of Shaolin” and “Return to the 36th Chamber” (both starring the inimitable bald-pated Gordon Liu], and Jet Li’s sensational debut “Shaolin Temple” and the sequel “Kids from Shaolin”.

With these classics in the back of my mind, “Shaolin” was looking just ok in the previews, the simulated Shaolin Temple sets having a kind of blah dusty-brown production design. [Jet Li’s “Shaolin Temple” had the distinct advantage of being shot in the authentic environment.] The assignment of HK director Benny Chan had me feeling ambiguous, as he’d previously made some “OK” action movies. I find that while the martial arts in his films can be fine to outstanding, the direction and surrounding elements tend to be pedestrian. It also was weighted with leads getting on in years, Andy Lau and Jacky Chan (who is actually more of a guest star).

The film begins in a milieu of military internecine contesting. Set in a [pre-?] Republican warlord era, Andy Lau is the focus as an amoral officer who, along with his evilly-coiffed 2nd-in-command Cao Man [Nicholas Tse] conquers Chinese territory which includes the legendary Buddhist Shaolin Temple, home of Chinese kung fu. Lau desecrates the place in just the opening minutes.

The first thrilling action sequence is a rollicking battle atop horse-drawn carts jostling at high speeds, which coincides with Lau’s major reversal of fortune.

From this point, the film follows Lau’s redemption, which starts out in a rather lackluster manner. Comparing the scene where Lau cuts his own hair to surrender into monkhood is lackluster compared to the blazing masochistic passion of a similar scene with Gordon Liu in “Eight Diagram Pole Fighter”. Also the plot and ancilliary characters seem to be just kind of plodding along, and one wonders if it’s going to be a good film after all.

Before you know it, it’s turned into something like Jacky Chan’s “Drunken Master II”, with slaves, a foreign plot to rob China of its priceless treasures, and Chinese running dogs facilitating the plunder. All of which is very much to the good; I can’t remember the last time an anti-imperialist theme was used so effectively in a Chinese action film.

Some strong action set pieces explicating Buddhist philosophy bring things up to the next level, and Jacky Chan suddenly is in the middle of the best comic relief action sequence – aided by a bunch of kiddie kung fu monks — that I’ve seen in years. An army attacks Shaolin Temple, and the film is very successful in showing the overcoming of firearms with fists and wit – something that’s usually just a laugh-out-loud proposition on the cinematic screen.

By the end the Temple blows up real good – really, the pyrotechnics are top-notch; the monks have adjusted their ethics dogma and armed themselves with slashing blades to dispatch the wolvish foreigners and their minions to hell, and Andy Lau is redeemed in an amazing scene, I can’t really think of a better representation of Buddhist salvation on cinema. In fact, considering all the films which have been based on Shaolin Temple, mostly they are concerned with the conflict between worldliness/violence and seclusion/pacifism. This one seems to me to have the best portrayals of Buddhism as redemption, making it probably the best overall allegory of the essence of Buddhism. I suppose it’s a credit to Lau that he can credibly pull off his character’s ultimate transformation.

The action by Corey Yuen and Yuen Tak is uniformly excellent without overdoing the wirework or CGI.

Honorable mention should be given to Fan Bingbing, who plays Lau’s warlord wife. While she’s basically a guest-star damsel in distress, she actually shows improvement as an actress, doing some decent emoting that transcends her recent transformation into eye-candy fashionista and cosmetics spokes-model. There’s also a resonant cameo by the actor who played Jet Li’s mentor in the original “Shaolin Temple”, here as the Temple’s abbot who gets a memorable stage exit.

Overall a film which verges on classic-hood, flawed by a mainly mediocre production design and lack of stronger directorial hand to tighten up the first half of the film. By the standards of 21st Century martial films, it’s a classic…
***

Film Business Asia’s review (by Derek Elley) rates the film 7 out of 10. “Potentially epic tale ends up as okay popcorn entertainment.”

Film Business Asia “Shaolin” review link: http://www.filmbiz.asia/reviews/shaolin

“Tony Leung Fights to Win in ‘The Grandmasters'” – first trailer of Wong Kar-wai’s 2011 martial arts film released, w/ English subtitles [CRIEnglish.com / Sweet & Sour Cinema]

Posted in Bruce Lee 李小龙, Hong Kong, Kung Fu, Sweet & Sour Cinema, Yuen Wo Ping 袁和平, Zhang Ziyi 张子怡 on July 19, 2011 by Zuo Shou / 左手

Trailer / article link: http://english.cri.cn/6666/2011/07/19/1261s649264.htm

2011-07-19 / CRIENGLISH.com / Web Editor: Xie Tingting

Check out the first trailer for Wong Kar-wai’s long-awaited film, “The Grandmasters”, starring Tony Leung Chiu-wai as the martial-arts legend Yip Man.

Leung’s character, a master of the Wing Chun style of martial arts, was the real-life mentor of kung-fu and Hollywood legend Bruce Lee. The trailer shows the master applying his lose-or-win fighting logic by defeating a mob on a raining night.

Leung is the only leading actor to appear in the trailer, although the film’s cast also includes Zhang Ziyi, Song Hye-kyo, Chang Chen and Zhao Benshan.

“The Grandmasters” is slated for release in December, eight years after Wong Kar-wai first began planning the film.

[Action director of the film is by Yuen Woo-ping – Zuo Shou]

[Trailer without English subtitles can also be viewed at Mtime.com: http://movie.mtime.com/104896/trailer/33560.html%5D

“Gallants” trailer w/ English subtitles [CRIEnglish.com / Sweet & Sour Cinema]

Posted in Hong Kong, Kung Fu, Sweet & Sour Cinema on May 21, 2010 by Zuo Shou / 左手

This trailer  for a forthcoming Hong Kong kung fu comedy with the English title of “Gallants” is FUN, especially for anybody who spent their adolescent Saturdays in decades past watching grainy kung fu flicks on TV.   Sorry folks that I can’t post the video directly here.  

From the CRI English article:  

Andy Lau presents “Gallants”  

“…Although the story is set in present-day Hong Kong, the film’s trailer easily conjures up the Shaw Brothers movies of the 1970s and ’80s.  The background music is familiar, and text in old-school fonts is deliberately printed from right to left.  A cast of ’80s stars also adds to the retro feeling.  

The…Hong Kong International Film Festival’s…Web site describes the film as “an exhilarating homage to Hong Kong’s action stars of yesteryear and Hong Kong’s action comedies.”  

“Gallants” will open on the Chinese mainland on June 4 without a Mandarin version, unlike most Hong Kong movies, which usually are released in an additional Mandarin version to cater to mainland audiences.  

“‘Gallants’ renders the feeling of old Hong Kong movies. In order to preserve that feeling for mainland movie-goers, we decided to only present its original Cantonese version,” said Yu Dong, president of Polybona, the movie’s distributor on the mainland.”  

I have no idea if this film will be worth checking out, the trailer is nearly impossible to live up to:  wiggy editing, ersatz Bruce Lee shouts and all.  

"Gallants" still (Photo: Mtime.com)