Archive for the Hu Jintao Category

Xi urges China to keep red [Xinhua]

Posted in China, CPC, CPC Central Committee (CPCCC), Hu Jintao, Jiang Zemin, Mao Zedong, Marx, Socialism with Chinese Characteristics on July 23, 2013 by Zuo Shou / 左手

SHIJIAZHUANG, July 12 (Xinhua) — Chinese President Xi Jinping has urged the 85 million members of the Communist Party of China (CPC) to work hard and serve the people wholeheartedly to “ensure the color of red China will never change.”

Party members should improve their work styles to withstand tests the Party faces and ensure the CPC’s nature is not compromised, said Xi, who is also general secretary of the CPC Central Committee.

He was speaking during a two-day inspection tour of north China’s Hebei Province, which concluded on Friday.

During the trip, Xi visited Xibaipo, an old revolutionary base, where the CPC leadership were based from May 1948 to early 1949 to draw the blueprint of the new country and prepare for the CPC’s new role as the ruling party.

Late Chinese leader Mao Zedong’s remarks on Party members’ work styles prior to the founding of New China in 1949 still have far-reaching ideological and historical significance, he said.

At an important meeting of the CPC in March 1949, Mao called on the whole Party to resolutely carry forward the work style of displaying modesty and prudence while guarding against conceit and impetuosity, and resolutely carry forward the style of working hard and plain living.

Xi said the comments bear lessons learnt from thousands of years of Chinese history, a summary of the process of the CPC’s growth, and profound thoughts on keeping the Party’s advanced nature and purity as well as on maintaining the prolonged stability of an upcoming state power.

Xi said he had been to Xibaipo many times. “Each time, I came with a lot of respect and left with many thoughts.”

Calling China’s revolutionary history the “best nutrient,” Xi said studying and recalling such history can bring “positive energy” to Party members.

Previous Chinese top leaders Jiang Zemin and Hu Jintao both visited Xibaipo shortly after they took office.

Xi’s visit symbolized the Party’s commitment to its traditions, said Prof. Wang Yukai, with the Chinese Academy of Governance.

Last December, Xi chose Guangdong, which served as the testing grounds for reform and opening-up policies more than 30 years ago, as the destination of his first inspection tour out of Beijing after taking the office of general secretary of the CPC Central Committee.

“The new leaders are learning from political wisdom and experiences of their predecessors,” Wang said.

Besides Xibaipo, also on Xi’s schedule was Zhengding County, where Xi had been Party chief in the early 1980s.

The President dropped in the house of a local farmer, visited a village community center and the provincial civil affairs department.

The Party’s performance at the grass-roots level matters very much, Xi said.

“If every CPC member and every grass-roots organ have a strong sense of responsibility and do a good job, the Party will be strong, the country will be strong and people will be strong. Thus, the Party’s rule will have a solid foundation,” he said.

The CPC leadership is unfurling a large-scale campaign against harmful work styles, aiming to improve Party-people relations.

At a meeting with provincial officials of Hebei, Xi asked the senior provincial officials to set the example in the campaign.

They should raise the bar higher, examine their own conduct and correct their problems with unselfishness and bravery, the president said.

Senior officials should show the people their courage and resolve to face up to their own problems and their willingness to take advice from the people as well as make actual moves, he said.

The people should be encouraged to take care of the cause of the CPC and be guided to exercise their duty of supervision, according to Xi.

While acknowledging the performance of Hebei, the President urged the province to focus on the quality and efficiency of its development, improve people’s well-being and protect the environment.

The country’s new leadership has sent out a clear signal that the key to the Party’s rule is to improve its capacity to rule and maintain its internal vitality, Prof. Wang said.

Article link, with photos: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/china/2013-07/12/c_132536880.htm

Also see “Behind Xi Jinping’s call for a return to Marxism” [Workers World] — http://www.workers.org/2013/07/20/behind-xi-jinpings-call-for-a-return-to-marxism/

“Time for tough measures” – Op-ed on China fighting Japan over Diaoyu Islands’ sovereignty [China Daily]

Posted in China, Diaoyu Islands, Encirclement of China, Hu Jintao, Japan, Okinawa, Reform and opening up, Sino-Japanese Friendship, South China Sea, US imperialism, USA, USA 21st Century Cold War on September 17, 2012 by Zuo Shou / 左手

by Chu Zhaogen

9-15-2012

China should forget about forging Sino-Japanese economic integration and fight against Japan’s resurging militarism

The Japanese government claims to have “purchased” China’s Diaoyu Island and Nanxiao and Beixiao islands for 2.05 billion yen ($26.15 million) from the Kurihara family, the so-called private owner of the Diaoyu Islands, and “nationalized” them.

Ignoring China’s repeated and strong representations, Japan stuck to its decision to “nationalize” the islands. Since Tokyo Governor Shintaro Ishihara announced the metropolitan government’s plan on April 16 to “buy” the Diaoyu Islands, Japanese right-wing forces have been wolfishly pushing their luck on China’s Diaoyu Islands.

Besides, the Japanese Lower House Committee on Land, Infrastructure and Transport has passed two amendments, granting Japan coast guards the power to arrest non-Japanese nationals, if necessary, from the uninhabited islands.

Ironically, the Japanese government has claimed that the Diaoyu Islands are being brought under state ownership to “maintain and manage them in a peaceful and stable manner”, not to irritate China.

To avoid a strong reaction from China, Japan also tried to downplay the Diaoyu Islands dispute by sending a letter written by Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda to Chinese President Hu Jintao, conducting “corridor diplomacy” on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation meeting, and promising not to change the status quo or build new structures on the Diaoyu Islands. It is clear that Japan is using both hard and soft tactics to further consolidate its illegal occupation of the Diaoyu Islands.

Behind the farce of “buying” the Diaoyu Islands, Japan has a much bigger plan. Since the United States announced its strategy of returning to Asia, Japan has been acting as “a pawn of the US” to encircle China.

By getting involved in the South China Sea dispute, playing up the “China maritime threat” and frequently holding large-scale joint military exercises with US forces, Japan, together with other US allies, is trying to contain China’s rise. Japan is not expected to stop provoking China and does not take seriously either the overall situation of Sino-Japanese relations or the peace and stability in Asia-Pacific. On the contrary, it has intensified its offensive against China, which poses the most serious challenge to Sino-Japanese relations in the new century.

Japan has ignored the Chinese government’s strong representations and resolute opposition and President Hu’s solemn warning at the APEC meeting against “purchasing” the Diaoyu Islands, which is a gross violation of China’s sovereignty. It has trampled historical facts and international law, made a mockery of the anti-fascist war (World War II) and poses a challenge to the post-war international order.

China should understand that under the garb of attempting to be a “normal country”, Japan is actually reviving its militarist past. History tells us that appeasement and compromise cannot halt the pace of an aggressor, and the result of appeasement will only be an even greater disaster. To avoid a repetition of history, China should exert sustained political and economic pressure on Japan, and take steps to avoid being led by the nose and to prevent Japanese right-wing aggressive actions.

First, a broader view is needed to resolve the Diaoyu Islands issue. The stealing of the Diaoyu Islands by Japan is a provocation for China and a blatant denial of the values and lessons of the anti-fascist war. So China needs to take a clear-cut stand on protecting these achievements, and use historical facts to expose Japan to the rest of the world.

China is a defender of the order in Asia-Pacific, particularly Western Pacific. It can further unite countries and peoples that once suffered under Japanese aggression. China should forget about forging Sino-Japanese economic integration and fight against Japan’s resurging militarism

The Japanese government claims to have “purchased” China’s Diaoyu Island and Nanxiao and Beixiao islands for 2.05 billion yen ($26.15 million) from the Kurihara family, the so-called private owner of the Diaoyu Islands, and “nationalized” them.

Ignoring China’s repeated and strong representations, Japan stuck to its decision to “nationalize” the islands. Since Tokyo Governor Shintaro Ishihara announced the metropolitan government’s plan on April 16 to “buy” the Diaoyu Islands, Japanese right-wing forces have been wolfishly pushing their luck on China’s Diaoyu Islands.

Besides, the Japanese Lower House Committee on Land, Infrastructure and Transport has passed two amendments, granting Japan coast guards the power to arrest non-Japanese nationals, if necessary, from the uninhabited islands.

Ironically, the Japanese government has claimed that the Diaoyu Islands are being brought under state ownership to “maintain and manage them in a peaceful and stable manner”, not to irritate China.

To avoid a strong reaction from China, Japan also tried to downplay the Diaoyu Islands dispute by sending a letter written by Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda to Chinese President Hu Jintao, conducting “corridor diplomacy” on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation meeting, and promising not to change the status quo or build new structures on the Diaoyu Islands. It is clear that Japan is using both hard and soft tactics to further consolidate its illegal occupation of the Diaoyu Islands.

Behind the farce of “buying” the Diaoyu Islands, Japan has a much bigger plan. Since the United States announced its strategy of returning to Asia, Japan has been acting as “a pawn of the US” to encircle China.

By getting involved in the South China Sea dispute, playing up the “China maritime threat” and frequently holding large-scale joint military exercises with US forces, Japan, together with other US allies, is trying to contain China’s rise. Japan is not expected to stop provoking China and does not take seriously either the overall situation of Sino-Japanese relations or the peace and stability in Asia-Pacific. On the contrary, it has intensified its offensive against China, which poses the most serious challenge to Sino-Japanese relations in the new century.

Japan has ignored the Chinese government’s strong representations and resolute opposition and President Hu’s solemn warning at the APEC meeting against “purchasing” the Diaoyu Islands, which is a gross violation of China’s sovereignty. It has trampled historical facts and international law, made a mockery of the anti-fascist war (World War II) and poses a challenge to the post-war international order.

China should understand that under the garb of attempting to be a “normal country”, Japan is actually reviving its militarist past. History tells us that appeasement and compromise cannot halt the pace of an aggressor, and the result of appeasement will only be an even greater disaster. To avoid a repetition of history, China should exert sustained political and economic pressure on Japan, and take steps to avoid being led by the nose and to prevent Japanese right-wing aggressive actions.

First, a broader view is needed to resolve the Diaoyu Islands issue. The stealing of the Diaoyu Islands by Japan is a provocation for China and a blatant denial of the values and lessons of the anti-fascist war. So China needs to take a clear-cut stand on protecting these achievements, and use historical facts to expose Japan to the rest of the world.

China is a defender of the order in Asia-Pacific, particularly Western Pacific. It can further unite countries and peoples that once suffered under Japanese aggression…

Second, the Diaoyu Islands dispute is intricately related to the status of the Liu Chiu or Ryukyu Islands. In 1951, the Treaty of San Francisco, which China says is illegal, was signed between Japan, the US and other countries, placing the Liu Chiu Islands (known as Okinawa today) under the trusteeship of the US. In 1971, Japan and the US signed the Okinawa Reversion Agreement, which arbitrarily included the Diaoyu Islands in the territories and territorial waters to be “handed back” to Japan. The Chinese government has condemned such backroom deals between Japan and the US.

China’s goal should at least be to gain actual control of the Diaoyu Islands. Also, because Japan unilaterally broke the understanding and agreement on the Diaoyu Islands that it reached with China during the talks to normalize bilateral diplomatic relations, China can change its decision to abandon claims of monetary compensation from Japan and make the compensation a prerequisite of the second normalization of bilateral ties.

Finally, China should get fully prepared to confront Japan’s right-wing extremism and militarism. Japan launched two wars against China – 1894-95 and in 1937-45 – which halted China’s modernization process.

Now after 30 years of reform and opening-up, China is rising peacefully. But many Japanese see that as a nightmare for Japan and are trying to foil China’s modernization drive a second time. Given Japan’s provocations, China should not adopt an ostrich-like policy.

Economically, China can forget about Sino-Japanese economic integration and instead impose political and economic sanctions on Japan. On the diplomatic front, China’s strategic competition with Japan should be direct until Japan unconditionally accepts the post-World War II order in East Asia.

Japan has to recognize China’s sovereignty over the Diaoyu Islands and atone for its past aggressions and atrocities, and take measures to punish those Japanese who deny the country’s violent past…Only if Japan does that will China and other Asian countries see it as a normal country. Otherwise, China should prepare for a long-term struggle.

The author is a Shanghai-based scholar in international studies.

[Edited by Zuo Shou]

Full article link: http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/opinion/2012-09/15/content_15760047.htm

President Hu Jintao meets with Raul Castro in Beijing – PHOTOS [Xinhua]

Posted in Beijing, China, Cuba, Hu Jintao on July 9, 2012 by Zuo Shou / 左手

Chinese President Hu Jintao (L) holds a welcoming ceremony for Raul Castro Ruz, president of Cuba’s Council of State and the Council of Ministers, at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, capital of China, July 5, 2012. (Xinhua/Zhang Duo)

Full photo article here

“Why Western leaders should refrain from meeting with Dalai Lama”: on Cameron – Dalai Lama schmooze [Xinhua]

Posted in Beijing, Cameron, Capitalism crisis early 21st century, China, Dalai Lama, Hu Jintao, Premier Wen Jiabao, Tibet, U.K. on May 20, 2012 by Zuo Shou / 左手

by Liu Chang

BEIJING, May 16 (Xinhua) — For many in China and Britain, it is a dark moment for China-Britain relations when Prime Minister David Cameron chose to meet with the Dalai Lama despite strong Chinese opposition.

The move not only tears open an old wound that has healed to a large degree in the past few years as the two countries have been working hard to shelve political differences and build a constructive partnership in the face of the global financial crisis.

It also reverses the positive momentum in the bilateral relationship carefully fostered by friendly high-level exchanges of leaders of the two countries in the past couple of years.

China has long made it clear that the Dalai Lama, who has for decades been engaged with activities aimed at separating Tibet from China, should never be hosted by leaders of other countries.

Any meeting, private or official, is interpreted by Beijing as a kind of endorsement for the anti-China secessionist and a blatant interference in China’s domestic affairs, which will inevitably lead to strained bilateral relations.

For Western leaders who cozy up to the Dalai Lama, their political calculations are pretty simple.

They do want to build a positive relationship with China, a promising export market and an increasingly credible partner in international affairs. But too often they also fall victim to the incorrect assumption that giving audience to the Dalai Lama could prove their moral clarity and help score easy political points at home.

The calculations are dead wrong because essentially the Dalai Lama is never what he claims to be.

Furthermore, they are wrong also because Western leaders cannot have it both ways when they have to choose between a sound relationship with China and unnecessary provocations like meeting with the Dalai Lama.

For Cameron, he has to bear in mind that China would not sit still while its core interests are trespassed on.

It is impossible for China to buy any excuses of such meetings, which should not happen under any condition, even though the British government claimed that it was a “private” occasion and Cameron is free to meet with anyone he chooses.

Also, there will never be a happy ending when a country works with China to seek economic and trade benefits on the one hand while on the other hand crossing over the line from time to time on issues concerning China’s core interests, including the issue of Tibet.

China has always held a sincere attitude in cooperating with Britain as well as other Western nations, especially in this time of eurozone debt crisis and global economic slowdown.

Meanwhile, President Hu Jintao, Premier Wen Jiabao and other Chinese leaders have expressed on many occasions their confidence in the European economy and pledged to help revive its sluggish recovery.

The British leader needs to know that turning a deaf ear to China’s protests would only backfire in the end, overshadowing the development of bilateral ties and cooperation, which is even more important to Cameron’s political future.

The damage on China-Britain ties has been made. And the key to restoring the bilateral relations to normality is now in the hands of Cameron and his government. It is highly advisable that proper actions be taken as soon as possible so that negative ramifications can be eliminated once and for all.

Article link: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/indepth/2012-05/16/c_131591592.htm

“US violates international law” – US government’s manifestly illegal dealings with Chen Guangcheng [China Daily]

Posted in China, China-US relations, Hillary Clinton, Hu Jintao, Law enforcement, State Department, US imperialism, USA, USA 21st Century Cold War on May 9, 2012 by Zuo Shou / 左手

2012-5-7

by Mo Neng

There has been much speculation and rumor since Chinese citizen Chen Guangcheng entered the US Embassy in China. Some Western media have made improper comments and have suggested that the United States put forward certain requirements to China about Chen; that China made this and that agreement.

This is absurd. Chen is a Chinese citizen. If the US government follows international laws and the basic norms of relations among nations, it does not have the right to make any demands on the Chinese government.

In fact, the US government has realized it was at fault and dispatched officials to talk with the Chinese government.

Spokesman Liu Weimin of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has made it clear that this issue can be quickly solved : “The US has expressed the importance it attaches to China’s demands and concerns, and promised to take necessary measures to prevent similar incidents. The US side should reflect upon its policies and actions, and take concrete actions to maintain the larger interests of China-US relations.”

Some people with ulterior motives have tried their best to play up this incident to destroy Sino-US relations, but the fourth China-US Strategic and Economic Dialogue was held as scheduled, with Chinese Vice-Premier Wang Qishan and State Councilor Dai Bingguo, special representatives of Chinese President Hu Jintao, and US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, special representatives of US President Barack Obama, co-chairing the dialogue. Certainly the outside world is eager for China and the US to construct a win-win cooperative partnership of mutual respect and mutual benefit and wanted the two countries to use the dialogue to chart a path of harmonious coexistence.

Healthy ties between the world’s largest developed country and the largest developing country are of such significance that they will not be held hostage by a single incident.

But no matter how hard the US tries to justify itself, it is an inescapable truth that the US government has made a mistake. It has broken international laws and Chinese laws and interfered in China’s internal affairs. For this, the US owes an apology to China.

As Liu Weimin stressed: “It should be pointed out that the US Embassy in China took Chen Guangcheng, a Chinese citizen, into the Embassy via abnormal means, with which China expresses strong dissatisfaction.”

The Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations expressly stipulates: “Without prejudice to their privileges and immunities, it is the duty of all persons enjoying such privileges and immunities to respect the laws and regulations of the receiving State. They also have a duty not to interfere in the internal affairs of that State.”

It also states: “The premises of the mission must not be used in any manner incompatible with the functions of the mission as laid down in the present Convention or by other rules of general international law or by any special agreements in force between the sending and the receiving State.”

Liu Weimin stressed : “The US Embassy in China has the obligation to observe relevant international laws and Chinese laws and should not engage in activities irrelevant to its duties. China can never accept the US move to interfere in China’s internal affairs, and has demanded the US side apologize for that, probe into the incident thoroughly, deal with those responsible, and promise to prevent similar incidents.”

Over the past three decades China’s economy has developed rapidly and its society has made great progress. It took Western countries hundreds of years to get to this stage. So it is unavoidable that China is facing the same problems that occurred in Western countries during their development.

If people choose to turn a blind eye to China’s development and irresponsibly criticize China, or even interfere in China’s internal affairs, they are actually hindering China’s development and we have to question their intentions.

China is a country under the rule of law. The legal rights of any citizen are protected by its Constitution and laws. Writing human rights protection into the Constitution, carrying out the National Human Rights Action Plan and amending the Criminal Procedure Law are important milestones that testify to China’s progress in human rights.

China has reiterated many times that every citizen has the obligation to abide by the Constitution and laws. No matter who breaks the law, the Chinese authorities will investigate and bring those responsible to justice. No outside interference is acceptable in this process.

The author is a writer with China Daily.

Article link: http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/cndy/2012-05/07/content_15221189.htm

The ouster of Bo Xilai: A critical moment in China [Workers World]

Posted in Capitalism crisis early 21st century, China, Corruption, CPC, CPC Central Committee (CPCCC), Hu Jintao, IMF - International Monetary Fund, Mao Zedong, Premier Wen Jiabao, Reform and opening up, State Department, USA on March 23, 2012 by Zuo Shou / 左手

By Fred Goldstein

Published Mar 22, 2012

It is now world news that Bo Xilai, a high-ranking member of the 25-member Politburo of the Chinese Communist Party, has been removed from his key post as Party Secretary of the important Chongqing branch of the CCP.

This move comes as the CCP is preparing to choose a new leadership this fall. Bo had been widely regarded as a clear candidate for the nine-member standing committee of the Politburo. That is now out. This is the first open breach in the Chinese CCP leadership in two decades.

Bo was known for trying to revive the culture of Mao Zedong through many public programs. He emphasized state intervention in the economy and advocated planning for massive low-income housing projects for migrant workers and others, as well as fighting to reduce inequality in general.

Bo has also been known for a fierce anti-corruption campaign in which the masses were encouraged to point out corrupt officials and gangsters. Several thousand people were arrested, among them business people, and many were sent to jail. The highest police official in Chongqing was executed during the anti-corruption campaign.

Bo was removed after an incident in which the subsequent police chief of Chongqing, Wang Lijun, who worked with Bo in a widely celebrated anti-corruption campaign, fled Chongqing on Feb. 6 to the U.S. Consulate in the nearby city of Chengdu and asked for political asylum.

According to Chinese government and party sources, Wang claimed to have documents incriminating Bo. Wang was taken from the consulate, and is now being held in Beijing.

There has been much speculation about Bo and Wang and what happened. Much has been alleged about Bo’s flamboyant personal style, his ambition, a factional struggle within the leadership for position and so on. Perhaps all these factors played some role in his ouster.

But one thing is clear. The imperialists have all taken a position against Bo, and are overjoyed to see his downfall.

To be sure, there is no evidence that Bo was trying to abandon the reliance on capitalism in China’s development that followed the death of Mao. On the contrary, his outlook is fully within the general framework of using capitalism and foreign investment to grow the economy in Chongqing. But within that framework, he emphasized the so-called “third hand,” the need for the state to play a significant role in the economy, to ensure the well-being of the masses and to reduce inequality as a matter of priority.

* Effect of global capitalist crisis *

It is important to put this struggle in the broader context of the global capitalist crisis and its effect on the Chinese economy and on the political and factional struggle inside China.

The economic crisis in the capitalist world has undermined in a very fundamental way the argument that China should bank its fate and future on capitalist development and the capitalist world market as a foundational strategy.

The collapse in 2007-2009 of the world capitalist financial system and the global market, the ensuing mass unemployment, the wild speculation, the overproduction, the economic dislocation, the flood of bankruptcies, the gyrations of the stock markets and the continuing threats on the horizon must haunt all of China’s leaders and give ammunition to all those who oppose the further unleashing of capitalism in China.

The imperialists and the more pro-capitalist forces in the CCP and the state know this. So they have rushed to fortify their position in the face of the monumental evidence of the failure of capitalism and its dangerous effects in China during 2008 and 2009.

They made their moves just as China’s legislative body was preparing to consider and approve various plans and when the subject of future leadership was under private discussion.

It is significant that the World Bank presented a 448-page document just in time for the 18th National People’s Congress last month, entitled “China 2030.” What makes the public presentation of this document so ominous is that it was co-authored by the Development Research Center of the State Council, the top executive body in China. Liu He, who worked on the document and who meets regularly with U.S. officials, is an adviser to the standing committee of the Politburo who has argued publicly that foreign pressure should be used to push capitalist reforms in China.

To underscore the collaborative nature of the document, the subtitle is “Building a Modern, Harmonious, and Creative High-Income Society.” The term “Harmonious Society” is the slogan of China’s present leaders, President Hu Jintao and Premier Wen Jiabao.

The world was treated to a video circulated online in February that showed Du Jianguo, editor of an environmental magazine in China, disrupting a press conference by World Bank President Robert Zoellick as Zoellick was unveiling his document. In front of the world press, Du stood up and denounced the document as “unconstitutional,” saying it would “subvert the basic economic system of socialism.” Before he was pushed off the platform by security, Du called the bankers’ document “poison” aimed at capturing China’s markets for international capitalists. (Wall Street Journal, Feb. 23)

* World Bank’s attempt to promote counterrevolution *

This document is part of the background to the factional struggle in China. It represents a firmer and more dangerous nexus between imperialism and the so-called “reform” faction, the more aggressive pro-capitalist faction, in China.

The Executive Summary of the document reads:

“First, implement structural reforms to strengthen the foundations for a market based economy by redefining the role of government, reforming and restructuring state enterprises and banks, developing the private sector, promoting competition, and deepening reforms in the land, labor, and financial markets. As an economy approaches the technology frontier and exhausts the potential for acquiring and applying technology from abroad, the role of government and its relationship to markets and the private sector needs to change fundamentally. While providing relatively fewer ‘tangible’ public goods and services directly, the government will need to provide more intangible public goods and services like systems, rules, and policies, which increase production efficiency, promote competition, facilitate specialization, enhance the efficiency of resource allocation, protect the environment, and reduce risks and uncertainties.

“In the enterprise sector, the focus will need to be further reforms of state enterprises (including measures to recalibrate the role of public resources, introduce modern corporate governance practices including separating ownership from management, and implement gradual ownership diversification where necessary), private sector development and fewer barriers to entry and exit, and increased competition in all sectors, including in strategic and pillar industries. In the financial sector, it would require commercializing the banking system, gradually allowing interest rates to be set by market forces, deepening the capital market, and developing the legal and supervisory infrastructure to ensure financial stability and build the credible foundations for the internationalization of China’s financial sector.”

In other words, the World Bank, with the collaboration of the Development Research Center of the State Council, is recommending that state enterprises be reduced to dispensers of state services and advice, withdraw from the production of infrastructure, steel, energy and other “tangible goods,” and leave that to private capitalists. They further recommend that the banking system be integrated with world imperialist finance capital and that state planning be reduced to a nullity.

In short, they advocate the destruction of the very socialist structures that hold Chinese society together and that have enabled it to withstand the most severe capitalist crisis since World War II.

For a representative of the highest state body to help draft such a counterrevolutionary document, publicly associate his name with it and urge its adoption shows the degeneration of key sections of the highest leadership and, within the broader state apparatus, highlights the pernicious influence of unleashed capitalism in China.

This explains the urgent disruption of Zoellick’s press conference and the push-back that is coming from various quarters in China. This is not to say that the viewpoint represented by the World Bank document will be victorious. There are many forces in China, including the workers and peasants, who would strongly resist any attempt to fully implement this program.

Christine LaGarde, head of the International Monetary Fund, also chose the moment of the National People’s Congress to issue a statement in high praise of China’s economy. This was undoubtedly coordinated with the World Bank presentation of “China 2030.”

The severity of the struggle over the future of China also broke out in the open at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in January.

“A group of Chinese speakers warned in stringent tones on Friday morning [Jan. 27] in Davos that the country’s free-market reform is stalled, and China is sliding backwards towards greater state control of the economy.

“Hu Shuli, editor of Caixin Magazine and widely recognized leader of China’s ‘reform’ faction, launched a breakfast forum by identifying delayed economic reform as one of the two key risks for the Chinese economy going forward, alongside the weakening exports in the wake of the euro-zone crisis.” (Wall Street Journal, Jan. 27) Other Chinese participants agreed.

The world capitalist crisis has brought this struggle on at a crucial time of change in the Chinese leadership. The ouster and public humiliation of Bo, which brought this struggle to light, can best be understood in terms of a struggle over dangerously deepening capitalist reforms. With or without Bo, this serious struggle will continue.

For those who believe that there has been a complete restoration of capitalism in China, this whole matter may seem to be of little importance. But to the workers and peasants of China and to the rest of the world, the question of stopping the further advance of the counterrevolution is of supreme importance.

To be continued.

Articles copyright 1995-2012 Workers World. Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article is permitted in any medium without royalty provided this notice is preserved.

Article link: http://www.workers.org/2012/world/china_0329/

China’s top political advisory body starts annual session [Xinhua]

Posted in Beijing, China, CPC, CPC Central Committee (CPCCC), Hu Jintao, Premier Wen Jiabao, Socialism with Chinese Characteristics on March 3, 2012 by Zuo Shou / 左手

BEIJING, March 3 (Xinhua) — The Fifth Session of the 11th National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC), the country’s top political advisory body, opened in Beijing Saturday.

More than 2,000 members of the CPPCC National Committee will discuss issues of major concern to the nation during the annual session scheduled to conclude on March 13.

At the opening meeting started at 3 p.m. in the Great Hall of the People, CPPCC National Committee Chairman Jia Qinglin delivered a report on the work of the CPPCC National Committee’s Standing Committee over the past year.

“The CPPCC made important contributions to implementing the Twelfth Five-Year Plan and winning new victories in building a moderately prosperous society in all respects” during the period, said Jia in his report.

Jia noted that the CPPCC held a grand celebration for the 90th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party of China (CPC), and organized activities under the leadership of the CPC Central Committee to commemorate the centenary of the Revolution of 1911.

He said the CPPCC also contributed to giving impetus to the country’s economic development and cultural reform, promoting social harmony and stability, strengthening relations with compatriots in Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan and with overseas Chinese, and expanding China’s foreign contacts.

Top Communist Party of China (CPC) and state leaders Hu Jintao, Wu Bangguo, Wen Jiabao, Li Changchun, Xi Jinping, Li Keqiang, He Guoqiang, and Zhou Yongkang attended the opening meeting.

Founded in 1949, the CPPCC consists of elite figures of the Chinese society who are willing to serve the think tank for the government and for the legislative and judicial organs.

As an open forum where the ruling CPC, non-Communist parties and people without party affiliation discuss state affairs freely and on an equal footing, the CPPCC has been the manifestation of China’s socialist democracy.

Article link: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/china/2012-03/03/c_131443971.htm