Archive for the Henan Province Category

China’s new grand canal brings water to arid north [China Daily / Sweet & Sour Socialism Essential Archive]

Posted in Beijing, China, CPC, Employment, Hangzhou, Henan Province, Mao Zedong, Sweet and Sour Socialism Essential Archives, Tianjin on March 21, 2015 by Zuo Shou / 左手

2014-12-16

~ Largest project of its kind, proposed in 1952, took more than a decade to construct ~

More than 1,400 kilometers of canal and pipeline began transferring water on Friday from China’s longest river, the Yangtze, to the country’s arid northern regions, including the nation’s capital, Beijing.

Completion of this section marks major progress in the enormous South-to-North Water Diversion Project, costing an estimated 500 billion yuan ($80 billion) and the largest of its kind in the world.

President Xi Jinping sent his congratulations on Friday to workers and people “who have made contributions” to the middle route project, calling the achievement a “major event” in the nation’s modernization drive.

He said the success has come through ceaseless effort by hundreds of thousands of people since construction started on Dec 30, 2003. More than 200,000 workers participated in the construction.

Xi described the project as important strategic infrastructure that would optimize water resources, boost sustainable economic and social development, and improve people’s livelihoods.

The south-north water diversion project is another feat of Chinese engineering, in the style of the Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal, the world’s longest man-made river, constructed in the 13th century to transport grain between the south and north.

Water will eventually flow via eastern, middle and western routes along canals, pipelines and tunnels. It took eight years for engineers and workers to complete two 4,000-meter-long tunnels under the riverbed of the Yellow River, China’s second largest.

The first-stage of the project, the eastern route, went into operation last year, sending water to Shandong province. By 2050, as many as 440 million people could benefit from the diversion of 44.8 billion cubic meters of water each year.

The middle route begins at Danjiangkou reservoir, in Hubei province, and runs for 1,432 km. It will supply 9.5 billion cu m of water per year to some 100 million people in the dry northern regions, including the cities of Beijing and Tianjin, and provinces of Henan and Hebei.

The water will meet household, industrial and agricultural demand, benefiting more than 100 counties.

President Xi urged the route’s management to protect the quality of water and to save water.

Work still needs to be done to ensure the livelihoods and employment of the 400,000 people displaced by the construction, including 345,000 people whose hometown was submerged as part of the massive Danjiangkou reservoir.

Premier Li Keqiang said the project will benefit both current and future generations, and urged the project management team to ensure the security and stability of supply.

The project was conceived by late Chinese leader Mao Zedong in 1952 but only approved by the State Council in December 2002, after nearly half a century of debate.

It has been widely hailed as an example of how the Chinese people are capable of bettering their lives through hard work. But the new waterway presents fresh challenges, such as the protection of water quality from unforeseen natural risks in the future.

Article link: http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2014-12/16/content_19093414.htm

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Cradle of Chinese Kung Fu, Shaolin Temple kicks its way into UNESCO heritage list with other historic monuments of Dengfeng / Mt. Songshan – PHOTOS [People’s Daily]

Posted in China, Henan Province, Kung Fu 功夫, Martial Arts, Shaolin Temple 少林寺, UNESCO heritage sites / intangible heritage on August 5, 2010 by Zuo Shou / 左手
 
 
August 2, 2010
 

Undated photo shows two monks of Shaolin Temple practicing Chinese kung fu at the Shaolin Temple in central China's Henan Province. The World Heritage Committee decided to include the Chinese Historic Monuments of Dengfeng in the World Heritage List on July 31, 2010, during its 34th meeting taking place in Brasilia, Brazil. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

The home of Chinese kungfu and Zen Buddhism, China’s Shaolin Temple is now part of humanity’s cultural heritage.

Nestled in the Mount Songshan of Central China’s Henan province, the historic architectural complex including the Shaolin Temple was added on Sunday to the UNESCO World Heritage List during a meeting of the World Heritage Committee in Brasilia, Brazil.
 

Martial arts performers celebrate the Shaolin Temple becoming part of a world heritage site on August 1, 2010. (ZHANG HONGFEI / FOR CHINA DAILY)

The new addition pushed China’s world heritage sites to 39, including 28 cultural heritage sites, seven natural heritage sites and four cultural and natural heritage sites.

UNESCO said the historical architecture complex stands out for its great aesthetic beauty and its profound cultural connotations.

The complex is composed of 11 traditional structures, including the Shaolin Temple, the Observatory, Songyang Academy, Taishi Towers and Zhongyue Temple.

With a history of more than 2,000 years, these monuments feature various architectural styles brimming with ancient Chinese culture.

They provide the world with a glimpse into ancient Chinese religion, philosophy, customs and scientific development, said Yang Huancheng, an expert of ancient architecture.

Shaolin Temple’s abbot Shi Yongxin said the UNESCO decision is a privilege, but it also adds pressure.

“For the monks, living in a world-recognized heritage site is a wonderful experience, but at the same time, our responsibility to protect the temple becomes even graver,” he said.
 

Tourists visit the Shaolin Temple in central China's Henan Province July 30, 2010. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

Shi, however, said admission prices will not rise, and the temple would try to provide better service for domestic and foreign visitors.

Shi said a higher profile for the Shaolin Temple will heighten the public’s awareness to protect the temple.

“I’m also looking forward to the addition of Shaolin kungfu into UNESCO’s intangible heritage list,” Shi added.

Local officials said they are getting prepared for more tourists from home and abroad.

“We’ve begun to organize tour guides learning to give introductions in English about the world heritage site, considering the increasing number of foreign visitors,” Zhu Jianping, a senior official of Dengfeng tourist bureau, told China Daily on Sunday.

Zeng Jianshu, a local resident, said as more tourists come, his business will undoubtedly benefit, too.

Though many people hailed the news, there were also frowns with some expressing doubts about the benefits to the area.

One netizen surnamed Mu said the arrival of more tourists might lead to an over-commercialization of the site.

“Too many tourists will destroy the tranquility and the sublime beauty of the religious constructions,” Mu said.

Xinhua contributed to this story.

Source: China Daily(By Chen Jia and Li Yuefeng) 

Photo taken on July 30, 2010 shows the pagoda forest of the Shaolin Temple, including 241 pagodas built between 689 and 1803 and 2 modern pagodas, in central China's Henan Province. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

Article link here 

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Following photos are from the PD article “Centre of Heaven and Earth” to bid for World Cultural Heritage in 2010 (dated July 31, 2010) 

Undated photo shows that monks of Shaolin Temple running out of the temple's gate in central China's Henan Province. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

 

Photo taken on July 30, 2010 shows a bas-relief at the Zhongyue Temple in central China's Henan Province. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

Photo taken on July 30, 2010 shows the pagoda forest of the Shaolin Temple in central China's Henan Province. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

  

Undated photo shows that monks of Shaolin Temple guarding in line outside the temple's gate at the Shaolin Temple in central China's Henan Province. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

Photo taken on July 30, 2010 shows the Yaocan Pavilion at the Zhongyue Temple in central China's Henan Province. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

Photo taken on July 30, 2010 shows a group of stone sculptures at the Songyang Academy in central China's Henan Province. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

Photo taken on July 30, 2010 shows a wooden gateway in front of the Zhongyue Temple in central China's Henan Province. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

Photo taken on July 30, 2010 shows the ancient Dengfeng Observatory, built in Yuan Dynasty(1206-1368), in central China's Henan Province. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

Photo taken on July 30, 2010 shows the gate of the Songyang Academy in central China's Henan Province. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

Photo taken on July 30, 2010 shows the gate of the Songyang Academy in central China's Henan Province. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

Photo taken on July 30, 2010 shows the Junji Hall at the Zhongyue Temple in central China's Henan Province. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

Undated photo shows a Shaolin student practicing Chinese kung fu on the top of a pagoda at the Shaolin Temple in central China's Henan Province. (Xinhua/Wang Song)

Source: Xinhua