Archive for the Reform and opening up Category

Row over ‘Western values’[People’s Daily]

Posted in China, CPC, Education, Reform and opening up on March 30, 2015 by Zuo Shou / 左手

from Global Times

Feb 2, 2015

Minister’s ideology criticism sparks discussion

Remarks made by China’s education minister in which he encouraged universities to “never let textbooks promoting Western values appear in our classes” have aroused discussion among the public, with many people criticizing his comments.

Education Minister Yuan Guiren made the remarks on Thursday at a forum in Beijing on improving ideological work in universities and colleges, urging universities to reinforce their ideological management, especially when it relates to textbooks, teaching materials and class lectures.

He told university officials to strengthen their management of the use of textbooks and materials directly imported from Western countries.

Also, the minister said remarks that slander the leadership of the Communist Party of China (CPC), smear socialism or violate the country’s Constitution and laws must never be promoted in college classrooms.

Many Chinese netizens have criticized Yuan’s remarks while some observers claimed that such criticism was generated by confusion and misunderstanding of the meaning of the phrase “Western values.”

“The ‘Western values’ in Yuan’s speech refer to Western political values and ideologies which were introduced into the country after China’s opening-up but cannot fit the country’s reality,” Yin Yungong, an expert on the socialist system at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, told the Global Times.

Yin added that China needs to learn advanced technologies and other useful ideas from Western countries. But some values and ideologies, such as “universal values” should be excluded from classes as they may jeopardize China’s political system and cause instability, Yin argued…

Excerpted; full article link: http://en.people.cn/n/2015/0202/c90882-8844564.html

Marxism key to problem solving: Xi [People’s Daily]

Posted in China, Corruption, CPC, Deng Xiaoping, Economy, Employment, Environmental protection, Mao Zedong, Reform and opening up, Socialism with Chinese Characteristics on March 3, 2015 by Zuo Shou / 左手

(Global Times) January 26, 2015

~Ideology a theoretical tool to unite officials in time of change: analyst~

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s recent stress on dialectical materialism has brought about a resurgence of Marxist ideology as the theoretical foundation of the Communist Party of China (CPC) amid the nation’s deepening reform, said observers.

Xi, general secretary of the CPC Central Committee, said Friday that all CPC members should value ideological work and promote “core socialist values” as he presided over a meeting attended by members of the Political Bureau of the CPC Central Committee, reported the Xinhua News Agency on Saturday.

The president reiterated that China will remain at the primary stage of socialism for a long time to come. Through 30 years of reform and opening up, China has made breakthroughs in productivity, comprehensive national strength and people’s living standards, but the situation and challenges both domestically and abroad are changing.

“We should grasp new traits in new phases of development, and stipulate guidelines in accordance with reality,” Xi said, adding that ideology should be at the heart of the Party.

The meeting followed a previous session in 2013 when the bureau delivered a similar lecture on Marxist philosophy.

Dialectical materialism, a key tenet of Marxist philosophy along with historical materialism, is a philosophical approach that views all changes in the world as the result of conflicts between opposites.

The president said that dialectical materialism, a strand of Marxist philosophy, should provide CPC members with the right approach to problem solving as China continues on its path of reform and development…

…The CPC, founded in the early 1920s, has advocated Marxism and socialism with Chinese characteristics as an ideological guidance to strengthen and modernize China…

Excerpted; full article link: http://en.people.cn/n/2015/0126/c90785-8840860.html

News Analysis: Business opportunity grows in DPRK despite challenges [Xinhua]

Posted in China, DPR Korea, Kim Jong Un, Reform and opening up, Socialism with Chinese Characteristics on February 26, 2015 by Zuo Shou / 左手

By Yoo Seungki

SEOUL, Jan. 28 (Xinhua) — Business opportunity in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) is growing for potential foreign investors as the closed economy is pushing a new type of socialist economy through reform and opening despite challenges such as lack of information, communication tools and transparency, global DPRK experts said Wednesday at a forum held in central Seoul.

Top DPRK leader Kim Jong Un is known to have introduced a so- called “May 30 Measures” in May 2014 to grant more autonomy in managing factories and more incentives for farmers. South Korea’s Unification Ministry has said there is no clear evidence of such measures being adopted by DPRK.

Despite no official announcement from the DPRK, a few clues were found. Choson Sinbo, a pro-DPRK newspaper based in Japan, reported in January that the DPRK will “set up a collectivist system that can respond flexibly” and that “socialist enterprises will take the lead.”

The new socialist economy scheme is believed to be an extension of the so-called “June 28 Measures,” adopted in June 2012 and made known to outside world by Choson Sinbo. The new plan is estimated to scale down the size of farming work unit to a ” family size” of 4 to 6 people, which could be allowed to leave up to 60 percent of their production on their hands. It is higher than the previous 30 percent ceiling.

Companies could be given more leeway in management, paying workers a wage in accordance with performance and handling inputs and outputs in a freer way than before. Andrei Lankov, professor at Kookmin University, said in a Nov. 30 Al-Jazeera editorial that the May 30 Measures were “revolutionary” and that the DPRK seems to have decided to begin “Chinese-style reforms…”

Excerpted; full article link: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/indepth/2015-01/28/c_133954121.htm

China unveils policies to revitalize northeast [Xinhua]

Posted in China, Economy, Employment, Heilongjiang Province, Housing, Jilin Province, Labor, Liaoning Province, Reform and opening up, State-owned Enterprise (SOE) on October 21, 2014 by Zuo Shou / 左手

BEIJING, Aug. 19 (Xinhua) — The Chinese central government announced an action plan to assist the northeast region’s staggering economy with a list of new measures.

The plan aims to free up private businesses, deepen reforms of state-owned enterprises (SOEs), develop modern agriculture, renovate urban rundown areas and launch dozens of infrastructure projects in the provinces of Liaoning, Jilin and Heilongjiang, according to the new measures announced Tuesday.

The 35 new measures, listed in a document by the State Council on its website, came as the northeastern regions saw the slowest economic growth among China’s provincial areas during the first half of this year.

China will speed up the construction of eight rail lines and build or expand 10 regional airports in the region, the document said.

SOEs are encouraged to sell part of their equities to private and foreign investors to build a mixed ownership system and pay for the reforms.

A new state-owned regional investment company will be established to hasten the reorganization of poorly run SOEs in the region, the document said.

The central government will support emerging industries including robotics, gas turbines, advanced marine engineering equipment and integrated circuits, as well as expanding the service industry of the region.

For traditional sectors such as agriculture, the document said the northeast provinces’ status as a core grain production base will be strengthened. Grain storage and logistical facilities will be improved.

The central government will fund the building of affordable housing and grain logistics facilities, included in a 60-billion-yuan (9.7 billion U.S. dollars) new credit reserve for shanty town renovation by the China Development Bank.

The document also named a few power transmission projects, nuclear power plant projects and heating projects to be initiated as part of a clean energy network in the region.

Once China’s industrial base, the northeast provinces relied heavily on SOEs to drive local economy but they fell short of the national economic growth of 7.4 percent in the first half of the year, with Heilongjiang’s GDP ranking at the bottom with an increase of just 4.8 percent during the period.

Editor: Luan

Article link: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/china/2014-08/19/c_133568678.htm

Commentary: China’s economy, to crash or just bashed? [Xinhua]

Posted in Anti-China media bias, Anti-China propaganda exposure, BBC bias, distortions and lies, China, China-bashing, Economy, Reform and opening up on March 7, 2014 by Zuo Shou / 左手

By Xinhua writer Chen Siwu

BEIJING, Feb. 27 (Xinhua) — China seems to have little to cheer about in recent weeks, from persistent toxic smog to an economic slowdown, according to recent reports by the Western media.

China has no excuse for the environmental crisis, but the hype about the country’s current economic slowdown requires reconsideration.

Among the gloomy reports by Western media is a film by Robert Peston, How China Fooled the World, carried by the British broadcaster BBC on its website.

Peston warns of a “serious risk of calamitous crash” of the Chinese economy, saying China could be in trouble and the third wave of the global financial crisis is looming large.

Such a conclusion is sensational, but not fresh.

Since China launched its reform and opening up drive, Western observers have foreseen the so-called “collapse” of China many times, but none have turned out to be genuine prophets.

The latest cry about China’s economy is like a fortune-teller in the street who talks nonsense, with predictions more resembling fictional thrillers than real-life previews.

What makes such predictions false is that they oversimplify China’s economy into one or a few numbers and then exaggerate them.

The number cited most by bearish analysts is 7.7 percent — last year’s growth, which tied with that of 2012 for the weakest since 1999.

So what?

Since China began posting GDP data in 1978, the country’s annual economic growth has dropped below 6 percent three times, below 8 percent nine times, below 9 percent 12 times, and below 10 percent 19 times.

To the woe of those passive observers, China’s economy never collapsed in previous slowdowns…

Excerpted; full article link: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/china/2014-02/27/c_133148003.htm

See also related article — “Commentary: Doomsday prophets misread Chinese economy” [Xinhua] – http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/indepth/2014-02/26/c_133144690.htm

Guangming Daily: Never abandon the mass line [People’s Daily]

Posted in China, Reform and opening up on June 30, 2013 by Zuo Shou / 左手

June 17, 2013

Edited and translated by Zhang Qian, People’s Daily Online

An article titled “A loyal proponent of the mass line” published in Guangming Daily on May 17 featured the deeds of Ma Zhiqiang, the deputy head of Ansai county, Shaanxi province, who has devoted himself to poverty reduction work and in so doing has become a close ally of the masses, and a dedicated practitioner of the Party’s mass line.

The article caused me a great deal of thought.

China is a large country, and most of its 1.3 billion population still live in rural areas. This is one of the most fundamental realities of the country, and it means that the living conditions of its farmers are a critical issue. Since China’s Reform and Opening up, great changes have taken place in the rural areas, and peasant life has improved significantly, but nationally there are many who remain in a state of relative poverty and backwardness. The farmers in Liuta village of Gaoqiao township, Ansai county are a typical example.

We must have a clear understanding about overall national conditions as a basis for our thoughts, plans, and future actions. Secluded among high mountains and deep valleys, the natural conditions of Liuta village make for a hard life. At present, the per capita net income in the village is far below the national average.

Ma Zhijiang has organized targeted surveys of other counties afflicted by similar natural conditions, but which have better record of development, to be carried out by party members, cadres, and the villagers themselves. He has applied his own efforts to helping the cadres and the masses to broaden their outlook and look at new ideas. Based on the results of these surveys, all have worked together to define specific goals for the five years to come. This embodies the way in which Ma Zhijiang has held to the party’s mass line.

How can we meet the needs of the people, and solve their practical problems? We cannot achieve this with empty talk and arbitrary initiatives. We must carry out surveys and conduct targeted research at the primary levels of the Party’s organizations. We should hold fast to the Party’s mass line, acting in response to the thinking of the masses, meeting their needs, and figuring out solutions to their problems.

In the second half of this year, the whole Party will address itself to actions concerning practical education on the Party’s mass line. Liu YunShan, a member of the Standing Committee of the Political Bureau of the Communist Party of China Central Committee, has asked all relevant departments to include the widest possible range of opinions in this project and the actions it will generate. There must be a full understanding of the importance of implementing the Party’s mass line – politically, globally, and strategically.

We should regard Liu Yunshan’s program as an opportunity to listen carefully to the wishes of the masses and gain a deep understanding of their requirements and suggestions. Following on from this we should take active measures to address the problems that people face in their daily and working lives. We must learn from outstanding leading cadres at the grass-roots level – from people like Ma Zhijiang – and use what we have learned to help us focus on scientific and planned methods to act in the interests of and for the benefit of the general public.

Read the Chinese version: 光明日报:永远不能放弃群众路线 [http://cpc.people.com.cn/pinglun/n/2013/0529/c78779-21659924.html]; Source: Guangming Daily Online; Author: Jin Wei

Article link: http://english.cpc.people.com.cn/206972/206974/8286443.html

New Chinese leader denounces Gorbachev [Workers World]

Posted in China, CPC, CPC Central Committee (CPCCC), Deng Xiaoping, Jiang Zemin, Lenin, Mao Zedong, Marx, Reform and opening up, Scientific Outlook on Development, USSR on March 14, 2013 by Zuo Shou / 左手

by Fred Goldstein
March 11, 2013

…But Xi continues dangerous policy of market ‘economic reform’

The new head of the Chinese Communist Party and president of the People’s Republic of China, Xi Jinping, is reported to have made a private speech to party leaders during a recent trip to southern China. In it, he denounced Mikhail Gorbachev, the Soviet leader who opened the door to the counterrevolution and the collapse of the Soviet Union. Xi reportedly pledged never to follow that road.

This speech, which has not been published in English, caused deep disappointment in imperialist circles. While it has been acknowledged in a front-page article of the New York Times and referred to in Businessweek and other capitalist publications, the ruling class is being relatively quiet about it, trying to remain optimistic about the prospects for deepening bourgeois political reform in China.

“Deepening political reform” is a code phrase for opening up the political process for bourgeois or petit-bourgeois political groupings, either outside or inside the Chinese Communist Party, that want to restore capitalism and break up the CCP. To the imperialists, gaining capitalist political power is even more important than market reforms, because it would lay the basis for destroying the foundations of the Chinese Revolution.

– Xi on collapse of USSR –

Reporting on Xi’s speech, the New York Times of Feb. 14 said: “Despite decades of heady growth, Mr. Xi told party insiders during a visit to Guangdong Province in December, China must still heed the ‘deeply profound’ lessons of the former Soviet Union, where political rot, ideological heresy and military disloyalty brought down the governing party. In a province famed for its frenetic capitalism, he demanded a return to traditional Leninist discipline.”

It quoted from a summary of his remarks reportedly circulated among party officials: “Why did the Soviet Union disintegrate? Why did the Soviet Communist Party collapse? An important reason was that their ideals and convictions wavered. …

“Finally, all it took was one quiet word from Gorbachev to declare the dissolution of the Soviet Communist Party, and a great party was gone.” Xi spoke of how some of the party leaders had Gorbachev arrested, but “Yeltsin stood on a tank” while the army stood by and did nothing to defend the party and the USSR.

The Times picked up the summary of the speech from a blog published by a counterrevolutionary, Gao Yu, who works with the German radio station Deutsche Welle. (Beijing Observation: Xi Jinping, posted by Yaxue Cao, Jan. 26)

Gao, who was twice imprisoned for supporting the pro-capitalist counterrevolutionary uprising at Tiananmen Square in 1989, has connections in China and published commentary and excerpts from the speech. According to the Times, the speech has been vetted by Chinese officials and others and is said to be authentic.

Gao quoted Xi as saying, “We must see clearly our place in history, see clearly the realistic goals as well as the long-term vision to which we are devoted. We are still in the early stage of socialism, and we must do whatever we can to realize the goals of the current stage. But if we lose sight of our vision as communists, we will lose our direction and succumb to utilitarianism and pragmatism. To uphold our ideals and beliefs, we must uphold Marxism-Leninism, Mao Zedong thoughts, Deng Xiaoping theory, the important contribution of the ‘three represents,’ and the Scientific Outlook on Development. The great renewal of the Chinese nation has been the greatest dream of the Chinese nation over the last couple of hundred years. The ‘China dream’ is an ideal. But of course, as communists, we should have a higher ideal, and that is, communism.”

Gao complained that Xi did not mention “political reform” once during his southern tour. This counterrevolutionary’s interpretation of the Xi speech was that it “was clearly intended to give the CCP ideology a renewed status,” meaning the official ideology of China, which is socialist, all the capitalist reforms notwithstanding.

The Times article mentioned that in one speech on the tour, Xi said that “Mao Zedong’s era of revolutionary socialism should not be dismissed as a failure.” The Times further pointed out that Xi has pledged to pursue “economic reform” but that “he won’t become a Gorbachev.”

We have no way of verifying the accuracy of the quotations and paraphrases from the speech. Nor can the revolutionary and progressive forces around the world, based on the workers and oppressed, get a true estimate of the relationship of forces in China between the right wing and the center, or what influence the left has. Furthermore, many details of the speech require critical examination.

– China and former USSR: similar problems –

But a few things are clear. There is enough pressure coming from the right to bring the hypothetical prospect of counterrevolution to the level of consciousness and discussion of the top leadership. A time of change in leadership, before the leaders get drawn into the all-consuming vortex of day-to-day responsibility for running the country, lends itself to trying to see China’s development within a broader perspective. It is in this context that Xi is going over in his mind the disastrous Soviet scenario in order to draw from it the lessons for China.

But it is dangerous for Xi to reduce the reasons for the collapse of the USSR to liberalism in politics, ideological deterioration, and the indifference and opportunism of the military.

Bourgeois forces — like those that were nurtured underground over many decades in the USSR in an atmosphere of bureaucratic privilege, got seduced by the material prowess of capitalism and were intimidated by relentless imperialist threats — are now operating completely above ground in China. Furthermore, while the proletariat was politically pushed out of the running of society in the USSR, the same can be said for the workers of China.

Being for “economic reform” as the route for developing China is to put the development of the productive forces above the development of socialist social relations. It means putting material accomplishment above class consciousness, class solidarity and the empowerment of the masses. This is precisely what present-day China has in common with the former USSR — despite the vast differences.

This is what led to Gorbachev. Only by putting an end to this orientation, begun by Deng Xiaoping after the defeat of the left, can the Chinese Revolution be revived and secured.

Article link: http://www.workers.org/2013/03/11/new-chinese-leader-denounces-gorbachev/

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