Archive for the Mao Zedong Category

‘Teenage Mao Zedong’ Animated Film to be Released 2015 April, w/trailer [CRIEnglish / Mtime.com / Sweet & Sour Cinema]

Posted in China, Mao Zedong, Sweet & Sour Cinema on April 14, 2015 by Zuo Shou / 左手

2015-03-03
Web Editor: Gao Junya

“The Young Mao Zedong,” [aka “Teenage Mao Zedong”] an animated film about the childhood experiences of late-Chinese [sic] leader Mao Zedong, is going to hit Chinese theatres on [2015 April 30th].

The movie itself is said to follow the adventures of a boy named Shi San Ya Zi and his friends.

However, it’s expected to parallel the younger life of the late helmsman.

Edited by Zuo Shou

Original CRIEnglish article title: ‘The Young Mao Zedong’; original CRIEnglish article link: http://english.cri.cn/12394/2015/03/03/3981s868324.htm

Post incorporates data from Mtime.com page “少年毛泽东(2015)- Teenage Mao ZeDong” http://movie.mtime.com/211937/

Trailer for “Teenage Mao Zedong” – http://video.mtime.com/53549/?mid=211937

China’s new grand canal brings water to arid north [China Daily / Sweet & Sour Socialism Essential Archive]

Posted in Beijing, China, CPC, Employment, Hangzhou, Henan Province, Mao Zedong, Sweet and Sour Socialism Essential Archives, Tianjin on March 21, 2015 by Zuo Shou / 左手

2014-12-16

~ Largest project of its kind, proposed in 1952, took more than a decade to construct ~

More than 1,400 kilometers of canal and pipeline began transferring water on Friday from China’s longest river, the Yangtze, to the country’s arid northern regions, including the nation’s capital, Beijing.

Completion of this section marks major progress in the enormous South-to-North Water Diversion Project, costing an estimated 500 billion yuan ($80 billion) and the largest of its kind in the world.

President Xi Jinping sent his congratulations on Friday to workers and people “who have made contributions” to the middle route project, calling the achievement a “major event” in the nation’s modernization drive.

He said the success has come through ceaseless effort by hundreds of thousands of people since construction started on Dec 30, 2003. More than 200,000 workers participated in the construction.

Xi described the project as important strategic infrastructure that would optimize water resources, boost sustainable economic and social development, and improve people’s livelihoods.

The south-north water diversion project is another feat of Chinese engineering, in the style of the Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal, the world’s longest man-made river, constructed in the 13th century to transport grain between the south and north.

Water will eventually flow via eastern, middle and western routes along canals, pipelines and tunnels. It took eight years for engineers and workers to complete two 4,000-meter-long tunnels under the riverbed of the Yellow River, China’s second largest.

The first-stage of the project, the eastern route, went into operation last year, sending water to Shandong province. By 2050, as many as 440 million people could benefit from the diversion of 44.8 billion cubic meters of water each year.

The middle route begins at Danjiangkou reservoir, in Hubei province, and runs for 1,432 km. It will supply 9.5 billion cu m of water per year to some 100 million people in the dry northern regions, including the cities of Beijing and Tianjin, and provinces of Henan and Hebei.

The water will meet household, industrial and agricultural demand, benefiting more than 100 counties.

President Xi urged the route’s management to protect the quality of water and to save water.

Work still needs to be done to ensure the livelihoods and employment of the 400,000 people displaced by the construction, including 345,000 people whose hometown was submerged as part of the massive Danjiangkou reservoir.

Premier Li Keqiang said the project will benefit both current and future generations, and urged the project management team to ensure the security and stability of supply.

The project was conceived by late Chinese leader Mao Zedong in 1952 but only approved by the State Council in December 2002, after nearly half a century of debate.

It has been widely hailed as an example of how the Chinese people are capable of bettering their lives through hard work. But the new waterway presents fresh challenges, such as the protection of water quality from unforeseen natural risks in the future.

Article link: http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2014-12/16/content_19093414.htm

Marxism key to problem solving: Xi [People’s Daily]

Posted in China, Corruption, CPC, Deng Xiaoping, Economy, Employment, Environmental protection, Mao Zedong, Reform and opening up, Socialism with Chinese Characteristics on March 3, 2015 by Zuo Shou / 左手

(Global Times) January 26, 2015

~Ideology a theoretical tool to unite officials in time of change: analyst~

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s recent stress on dialectical materialism has brought about a resurgence of Marxist ideology as the theoretical foundation of the Communist Party of China (CPC) amid the nation’s deepening reform, said observers.

Xi, general secretary of the CPC Central Committee, said Friday that all CPC members should value ideological work and promote “core socialist values” as he presided over a meeting attended by members of the Political Bureau of the CPC Central Committee, reported the Xinhua News Agency on Saturday.

The president reiterated that China will remain at the primary stage of socialism for a long time to come. Through 30 years of reform and opening up, China has made breakthroughs in productivity, comprehensive national strength and people’s living standards, but the situation and challenges both domestically and abroad are changing.

“We should grasp new traits in new phases of development, and stipulate guidelines in accordance with reality,” Xi said, adding that ideology should be at the heart of the Party.

The meeting followed a previous session in 2013 when the bureau delivered a similar lecture on Marxist philosophy.

Dialectical materialism, a key tenet of Marxist philosophy along with historical materialism, is a philosophical approach that views all changes in the world as the result of conflicts between opposites.

The president said that dialectical materialism, a strand of Marxist philosophy, should provide CPC members with the right approach to problem solving as China continues on its path of reform and development…

…The CPC, founded in the early 1920s, has advocated Marxism and socialism with Chinese characteristics as an ideological guidance to strengthen and modernize China…

Excerpted; full article link: http://en.people.cn/n/2015/0126/c90785-8840860.html

“China Voice: Lessons learned from a forced expedition” – On the 80th Anniversary of the CPC’s epic ‘Long March’ [Xinhua]

Posted in China, CPC, Mao Zedong, USSR on October 19, 2014 by Zuo Shou / 左手

by Li Huizi

BEIJING, Oct. 17 (Xinhua) — As the country marks the 80th anniversary of the Long March’s departure, the Communist Party of China (CPC) should ponder lessons learned from a forced expedition that made history.

The Long March, the beginning of a forced expedition of the First Division of the Red Army on October 16, 1934, was a 12,500-km trek full of hardships, bloodshed and do-or-die battles.

Flawed decision-making and unwise military tactics resulted in the setbacks suffered by the Red Army during the encirclement campaigns led by the Kuomintang (KMT) armies, and contributed to the loss of the whole revolutionary base.

In the early stages of the Long March, the CPC’s almost unconditional obedience to the Comintern, the Soviet Union’s policymaker for communist parties in other countries, was a factor in the decimation of the Red Army, whose numbers slumped from 86,000 to 30,000 at the end of 1934.

China’s revolution suffered enormously and the CPC nearly came to an end. The overreliance on external forces showed the immaturity of the CPC at that time. Comintern, who knew little about China and adhered rigidly to Soviet Union experience, simply rejected Mao Zedong’s advice of splitting into small units and fighting guerrilla campaigns.

In January 1935, in the third month of the Long March, the Communist forces reconsidered their strategy independently at an enlarged meeting of the Political Bureau of the CPC Central Committee in Zunyi in southwestern Guizhou province. Mao entered the inner circle of power and began to gain the final say.

Led by Mao, a small group of fewer than 30,000 communists broke through the siege lines of about 400,000 KMT troops, and completed the unprecedented expedition in two years, with 10,000 soldiers left. The journey was full of extremely dangerous and complicated situations, and every day was a struggle to survive.

Many believe it was the Long March that shaped the CPC.

It led the Party to realize that the leadership’s top-level design is paramount and brooks no mistake. A right path chosen by the CPC determines success, or else the Party and the nation suffer greatly, or even come to a miserable end.

The maturity of a political party lies in independent decision-making and problem solving in accordance with changing situations. The famous “seeking truth from fact,” the Party’s most sacred guideline, was proclaimed at the Zunyi meeting. The doctrine advocates that the Party should always think by itself in a practical and realistic way.

Along the way, the CPC seriously reflected on its mistakes and grew mature. Under the guideline formulated through the Long March, the Party won the revolution, founded New China, launched reforms and achieved economic miracles.

It is not rare for political parties to make mistakes. Mistakes including the Great Leap Forward (1958) and the turbulent Cultural Revolution (1966-1976) deviated from the principle of “seeking truth from fact.” The Party should resolutely adhere to inner-Party democracy and learn from these lessons.

Ruling a nation with 1.3 billion people, the CPC will face more hardships and tests in the future. It should learn to mend its ways and maintain the right path at the helm.

During the Long March, the CPC learned a hard but valuable lesson.

Editor: yan

Article link: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/china/2014-10/17/c_133725236.htm

2014 1 May: International Labor Day Greetings from Sweet & Sour Socialism blog! 祝你们劳动节快乐!

Posted in China, Holidays in China, Mao Zedong, May 1 on May 1, 2014 by Zuo Shou / 左手

社会主义制度的建立给我们开辟了一条到达理想境界的道路,而理想境界的实现还要靠我们的辛勤劳动。 —— 毛泽东 [3edu.net “五一劳动节的名言名句”] http://ws.3edu.net/ldj/ws_152725.html

English translation of preceding Mao Zedong quote:

“The establishment of our socialist system has opened the road leading to the ideal society of the future, but to translate this ideal into reality needs hard work.” – [‘The Chairman and I’ – Chairman Mao quotes] http://www.thechairmanandi.com/chairman-mao-quotes%5D

Have a great holiday!!!

Zuo Shuo / Sweet & Sour Socialism Blog

Xinhua Insight: “Mao fans, minority worship?” – Deification, sober appreciation of Chairman Mao [Xinhua / Sweet & Sour Socialism Essential Archives]

Posted in Buddhism, China, Economy, Education, Employment, Labor, Mao Zedong, Mao Zedong, Myanmar, PLA, Sweet and Sour Socialism Essential Archives on January 24, 2014 by Zuo Shou / 左手

by Xinhua writers Wang Jiaquan, Li Huaiyan

XISHUANGBANNA, Yunnan, Dec. 25 (Xinhua) — Chairman Mao is another God in the largely Buddhist hamlet of Man’en, where most ethnic Dai villagers enshrine the founding father of New China at home, though the “great helmsman” was de-deified after the end of the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976).

A large portrait of Mao Zedong hangs high in the living room of Ai Pa, with a smaller image of a senior Myanmar monk by its side. This arrangement was a suggestion from the Buddhist clergyman, who presided over a prayer service for Ai’s new house in 2000.

When Ai requested a portrait from the monk to be used as a “home guardian” after the ceremony, the monk insisted his image be placed in a subordinate position to that of Mao, saying that Mao was a real savior and guardian of the ethnic Dai people.

Loving almost all Mao things, from his quotations to the passionate red songs, Ai Pa remains a loyal Mao fan even though his family suffered during the Mao era.

Ai’s family was classified as a landlord during the land reform in the 1950s, and his father fled to neighboring Myanmar only a few days after Ai’s birth in 1957 in fear of penalties as denouncement campaigns against landlords swept Menghai County in Xishuangbanna, southwest China’s Yunnan Province.

As the descendant of a landlord, Ai Pa had to face discrimination when he grew up. He was rejected when he registered to join the People’s Liberation Army.

Indeed, Ai does think his family was wronged. “My ancestors were all poor peasants. It was not until my grandpa reclaimed some wasteland that our family began to own some paddy fields and hire a few laborers,” he says.

However, all the adversities have not resulted in a resentful Ai Pa. “A Buddhist should not return grudge for grievance,” says the 56-year-old man.

In addition, he says, he admires Chairman Mao because the late leader was a man who truly wanted to do good for the people, and he appreciates the value of equality that emerged in the Mao era.

Most villagers owned no land before the land reform in Xishuangbanna, where the feudal lord claimed ownership of all land and peasants had to shoulder the heavy and inescapable burden of taxation, according to He Ming, an ethnic studies professor at Yunnan University in Kunming.

Ai Pa recalls that when he was a child, old people in the village told him that Chairman Mao was like the Monkey King in the traditional Chinese fairy tale of the Pilgrimage to the West, who was invincible and was commissioned by the Heaven to bring fairness and equality to the world.

WHY NOT MAO?

Three decades into China’s reform and opening-up drive, Man’en, as well as many other remote villages, has witnessed drastic economic and social transformation.

Satellite television broadcasts, mobile phones, motorcycles, cars, highways and the Internet have shortened the distance between them and the outside world. And yet Mao has remained an icon in the hamlet that has more than 6,000 villagers.

A Mao portrait bought in Beijing is always regarded as a very precious souvenir for local villagers, while Mao’s mausoleum is usually a must-go for their maiden trips to the national capital, says Ai, who is also chief of Man’en village.

Like Ai Pa and his fellow villagers, the ethnic Blang people in Jiliang, another village with a population of over 2,000 in Menghai, are also Mao worshipers. They have his images printed on glazed bricks on the outside walls of their new homes.

However, these ethnic minority hamlets are not isolated cases. A survey by the Horizon Research Consultancy Group in 2008 in 40 Chinese cities and towns, including Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou, showed that 11.2 percent of respondents enshrine Mao Zedong at home, way ahead of those that worship the Buddha, God of Wealth, and other gods.

In the words of Huang Jisu, a sociologist, playwright and cultural critic, Mao worship is a quite complicated phenomenon and has a strong social background, and is also related to personal experiences.

However, Huang doesn’t believe there is a geographical, age or social class division in regard to people’s attitude toward Mao.

For example, Huang says, there are also Mao fans in big cities like Beijing and Shanghai, while some young people in universities also admire him. Huang also notes that it is not rare for entrepreneurs and millionaires to admire Mao.

However, Huang stresses that admiration for Mao does not necessarily mean the admirers want to go back to the Mao era.

“It’s quite natural for Mao, such a great man, to have admirers. Just as pop stars can have so many fans, why not Mao?” says 58-year-old Huang, a researcher with the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing.

As for Mao fans, Huang says, ordinary people psychologically need a great person to hold in high esteem, and Mao has filled – and fills – that need.

In Huang’s view, the greatest good that Mao did for the nation was the Chinese revolution he led, which ended the nation’s survival crisis that had lasted a century.

PASSION IN LENS

Both Sun Yat-Sen and Chiang Kai-shek failed to lead the nation out of that crisis, and Mao was an unrivaled great man of his century, Huang says.

Sun Dahong, a photographer who has published an album featuring ethnic Mao fans, argues that the modern passion for Mao has nothing to do with a personality cult.

“It’s never a political fervor that creates blind followers like those during the Cultural Revolution, but a kind of spontaneous affection or emotion that has sprouted at the grassroots and passed from generation to generation,” says Sun, a former provincial deputy police chief of Yunnan…

…”There have always been concerns that today’s society is one without belief, but I have rediscovered it among the ordinary people. Mao worship is an instinctive expression of their emotion and perhaps even reflects a higher level of spiritual need,” Sun says.

“To his worshipers, Chairman Mao stands for auspice and victory, represents social justice and is a man that leads them to common wealth. So they believe in, respect and love Chairman Mao,” Sun says.

Also a Mao fan, Sun actually shares some similarities with Ai Pa. Sun’s mother, a provincial cadre in Yunnan, was persecuted to death during the Cultural Revolution when Sun and his younger brother were both in Shanxi Province receiving reeducation from local peasants.

His mother’s death has been a lingering anguish but Sun has never blamed or hated Chairman Mao. After all, he says, blames for personal grievances should not all go to a policy maker.

As for Mao’s errors, a controversial topic, Sun would like to quote a man he met in Dehong, an autonomous prefecture of ethnic Dai and Jingpo, when shooting his album:

“Chairman Mao’s contributions and merits are like a majestic mountain, but his faults can be measured in just a handful of earth.”

Huang Jisu agrees that Mao’s mistakes should be put under critical analysis, but he argues that criticism should be based on facts instead of rumors or even slanders.

“For such an epoch-making man, he is always a giant, no matter what the comments are, be it praise or censure,” Huang says.

Excerpted by Zuo Shou

Full article link: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/indepth/2013-12/25/c_132994178.htm

“Xi: Holding high the banner of Mao ‘forever'” – 120th Anniversary of the Birth of Mao Zedong [Xinhua]

Posted in Beijing, China, CPC, Mao Zedong, Socialism with Chinese Characteristics on December 26, 2013 by Zuo Shou / 左手

BEIJING, Dec. 26 (Xinhua) — Chinese President Xi Jinping said on Thursday that the Communist Party of China (CPC) will hold high the banner of Mao Zedong Thought “forever” in pursuing the Chinese nation’s rejuvenation.

While commemorating the 120th anniversary of the birth of the late Chinese leader, Xi hailed Mao and other members of the older generation of revolutionaries as “great figures” in fighting national and class oppression, as well as standing at the wavefront of the positive tide in the Chinese nation and world.

At a symposium held by the CPC Central Committee in Beijing, Xi said Mao, the principal founder of the CPC, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army and the People’s Republic of China (PRC), was “a great proletarian revolutionary, strategist and theorist.”

Xi also hailed Mao as “a great patriot and national hero” and the core of the first generation of the Chinese leadership.

“Mao is a great figure who changed the face of the nation and led the Chinese people to a new destiny,” said Xi, also general secretary of the CPC Central Committee and chairman of the Central Military Commission.

He pointed out that a correct historical view must be adopted to appraise a historical figure.

“Revolutionary leaders are not gods, but human beings,” Xi said.

“(We) cannot worship them like gods or refuse to allow people to point out and correct their errors just because they are great; neither can we totally repudiate them and erase their historical feats just because they made mistakes,” Xi said.

“(We) should not simply attribute the success in historical favorable circumstances to individuals, nor should we blame individuals for setbacks in adverse situation,” he said.

“(We) cannot use today’s conditions and level of development and understanding to judge our predecessors, nor can we expect the predecessors to have done things that only the successors can do,” he said.

Mao’s greatest contributions are that he led the Party and the people to find the correct path of New-Democratic Revolution, completed the anti-imperialism and anti-feudalism tasks, established the PRC and the basic socialism system, achieved fundamental success in socialist construction, and pooled experiences and created conditions for China’s exploration of building socialism with Chinese characteristics, according to Xi.

“The banner of Mao Zedong Thought could not be lost and losing it means a negation to the Party’s glorious history; The principle of holding high the banner of Mao Zedong Thought should not be wavered at any time and we will hold high the banner to advance forever,” the president quoted late Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping as saying.

However, Xi said it cannot be negated that Mao took detours during the exploration of the path of building socialism, admitting he made “serious mistakes” in his later years, especially during the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976).

“Comrade Mao Zedong’s mistakes in his later years have their subjective factors and personal responsibility, and complicated social and historical reasons both at home and abroad also played their part. They should be viewed and analyzed comprehensively, historically and dialectically,” Xi said.

Xi said it was not easy to find a correct path. “The path decides the nation’s destiny,” he said.

“Socialism with Chinese characteristics does not just fall from the sky,” Xi said, adding that it was achieved through the toil and sacrifice of the Party and the people…

Excerpted by Zuo Shou

Full article link: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/china/2013-12/26/c_132998764.htm